The Story of Your Happiness

By Rev. Kathleen Rolenz

2016-2017 was “The Year of the Story,” with each month exploring the answer to the question: “Tell Me a Story about a Time When You…” We’ve looked at experiences such as “faced your fears,” or “found your voice.” This is Rev. Rolenz’ last full service, so we’ll look back at some of the concerns we’ve uncovered, the joys we’ve shared, and the new story that is being written for the Fellowship’s future. This service will include the 95th anniversary of the Flower Ceremony, created by Reverend Norbet Capek of the Czech Republic. Bring a flower to share to create our common bouquet, and you’ll take a new one home with you, as a reminder that a joy shared is a joy increased.

Love is the Doctrine of our Fellowship

by Marie Luna, Congregational Life Coordinator

Warm. Welcoming. Open. Strong community. We have heard similar statements from newcomers since the early days. How have we held true to these core values when we had 100 members? 400? 700? Marie will share stories from her experiences as well as stories from some of our longest term members. We will also look ahead to the next chapter of our story, that includes a new settled senior minister and potentially a lot more new people looking for a community like ours.

Loss and Possibility

by Rev. Christina Leone-Tracy

Join our Senior Minister Candidate, Rev. Christina Leone-Tracy, for the first Sunday of Candidating Week! We’ll be exploring the possibilities for the future, while honoring the loss inherent in transformation. We will also look at some the challenges in our UUA and how we are being called to the work of dismantling white supremacy.

Second Chances

by Rev. Kathleen Rolenz

In a world where nothing is permanent, we treat death as the exception. For those who celebrate Easter, Jesus’s resurrection is experienced as important theological “second chance.” On this Easter Sunday when Christians celebrate Jesus’ resurrection as we’ll look with at the problems and possibilities of life – before and after death.

Risking Sanctuary

by Rev. Kathleen Rolenz

Several Unitarian Universalist congregations have already become, or are preparing to become a “Sanctuary” congregation to house undocumented persons under threat of deportation. Many in our community live in fear of deportation and are looking for safe harbor at churches and congregations who are willing to support them. What are the moral issues around immigration – and do those moral issues call us, as a congregation, to provide sanctuary?

Our True, Original Course

Rev. Kathleen Rolenz, Jay Thomas, Music Director, and Fellowship Member John Newhall

One of the ways in which people navigate themselves when lost at sea is to chart a course using the north star. There’s no denying that we live in a time of great change, and many have said they felt “at sea.” How do you navigate your way through conflicting narratives, alternative facts and the many pulls and demands of life in such a way that reflects what one poet calls “our true, original course?”

Excerpt from “The Buried Life” with the Fellowship Choir, Set to music by Jay Thomas

Changing Our Story

with the Stewardship Team

For many years, the story of the Fellowship’s life has been “we do well with what we have.” As the Fellowship enters another chapter of its life, we (Fellowship members) need to change that story to one where we have the resources to fully embrace our mission. This multigenerational service will be led by members of the Fellowship as they identify the ways in which the story we have told ourselves about the fellowship needs to change; as a new, and exciting one begins to emerge.

How I Learned Not To Trust My Feelings

by David Dodd

We’ve all heard that it’s important to trust our feelings if we want to live a fulfilling life. But what if we have a mental illness that interferes with our moods, such as major depression? David Dodd will describe the time he took the risk of living without the anti-depressants that manage his major depressive disorder, and what he learned about living with strong emotions that he could not trust.

Skeleton Architecture of Our Lives: A Bridge Across Our Fears

by Rev. Leah Hart-Landsberg

Poetry is an ancient global art form about which much has been made and said. There are probably as many opinions on and uses for it as there are poems and poets. Based on this month’s Wellspring Wednesday adult enrichment program (6:30 pm on February 8th; theme of poetry as a spiritual practice), Rev. Leah, worship leader Tina Main and local acclaimed poet Cathryn Cofell will reflect on the idea that poetry can be a skeleton architecture of our lives. This metaphor of skeleton architecture comes to us from Audre Lorde, who says that “poetry is not only dream and vision; it is the skeleton architecture of our lives. It lays the foundations for a future of change, a bridge across our fears of what has never been before.”

Hearts, Guide Us

by Rev. Brian Mason

To find delight in the world is a risk. Left to their own devices the assaults of the world can whittle away at our passions and dreams, wreaking havoc on our hearts and hopes. Messages of great divide and upheaval rock us each night, especially so in this time of transition and unknowing. Acquiescing to such messages is tempting, but we can gather together as the beloved community in an act of resistance: let us risk to dream the world anew.