Tiny Space

by Rev. Leah OngiriActs of care and experiences of connection can sometimes seem insignificant on their own. But the tiny space created by a sympathetic phone call or homemade meal left on the doorstep looms large in community. The care team is especially devoted to this work, but all Fellowship members and friends share the…

Reclaiming Power

by Rev. Leah OngiriAs is our tradition, we mark the Jewish High Holy Days by reflecting with Rev. Leah and Jaclyn Kottman and experiencing ancient sacred music offered by Dan Van Sickle and Mark Urness. Same service—and yet, like so much these days, it will be different. During a global pandemic, how might Judaism suggest…

To Imagine

by Rev. Leah OngiriOne of the first local UU ancestors Rev. Leah learned about when she moved to Wisconsin was Lewis Allen McGee, a Chicago-based Humanist and one of the first African American Unitarian ministers. After preaching on him in her first year of ministry to the Fellowship, she started thinking about him a lot…

“Why Was I Born?”: A Service of Questions

by Rev. Leah OngiriThis poignant title of the song popularized by Billie Holiday—and our special music for the morning—will set the stage for one of our traditional question sermons. Come with a question or few (about Unitarian Universalism, the world, or anything else), and Rev. Leah will spontaneously respond to as many as time allows….

Toilet Paper, Togetherness, and Healing

by Rev. Leah OngiriAt the Fellowship it’s our year of healing but there’s a global pandemic raging in the world. We’re scared to get close to each other but everyone is talking about how we’re all in it together. Toilet paper is suddenly a hot topic but the truth about its scarcity and abundance is…

“The truth will set you…”

by Rev. Leah Ongiri Despite what the oft-quoted biblical verse implies, freedom isn’t automatically guaranteed by knowing the truth. Squaring with the truth can be a tricky but worthwhile part of healing a relationship with self, other, or community. True release can come from honestly incorporating what we know into our story as we move…

In Defense of Anger

by Rev. Leah Ongiri Rev. Leah grew up learning that anger is a deeply undesirable emotion. It’s dangerous, antisocial, immature, unhelpful, and to be squelched at all costs. This service will explore the opposite side(s) of anger. Does it have nuance—are there different kinds of being mad? Can being pissed off ever teach or help…